IMPORTANT NOTICE: NEW SITE!
I have a real website now rather than a blog. Though I will keep this one open for a while, I will no longer keep this one up. My new site, "USA Spiders" is not fully completed but getting close. I made sure to get the Michigan page finished first. :o) Please use
USA Spiders in the future and if you find any problems with the site, please let me know so I can fix them.




Spiders verified to be here in Michigan are listed on the left sidebar. On the right sidebar, are the spiders of which pictures have been sent in to me.

The BROWN RECLUSE SPIDER! - Rick Vetter, the worlds top expert on the Brown recluse has published a book on the infamous Brown recluse spider. Learn the truth behind the worlds most misunderstood spider. (BUY IT HERE!)

My Disclaimer
My Knowledge and Why I am Not an Expert

Spider Questions and IDENTIFICATION Requests
My EMAIL can be found in the above link. I am always happy to help identify a spider, but please do us both a favor and read this before emailing me. Thanks.

Describing your Spider ..... Photographing your Spider

Your Fear of Spiders
........... Spiders in your Home?


FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT.....

Beyond Spider Dome - Where two spiders enter and one comes out.

Spiders and Drugs - Documentary video about the effects different drugs have on spiders.

Play with a computerized spider
- (flash)

Spider Diagram. - Basic anatomy of a spider.

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Michigan Spiders the EBOOK Coming Soon

When I created Michigan Spiders, I had no idea there were so many people who would look up spiders on a daily basis. I did not expect to get so many emails with pictures of spiders people took, asking me to help them identify them. Not that I am complaining, mind you. I enjoy helping. Then I noticed one downfall of Michigan Spiders on-line.

The spiders had to be caught or pictures taken for people to look them up!

If you are out at a park, camping, visiting friends, or wherever you might be. If you saw a spider, you would have to wait until you could get to a computer to look them up. After all, not everyone has the Internet on their phones, and to be quite honest, I have no idea how Michigan Spiders looks on a phone.

So this got me to thinking. Why not create an E-book for Michigan Spiders?

Many phones have the ability to read Ebooks. Many people have Nooks and Kindles and other Ebook readers. If they could have their own personal Michigan Spiders Ebook on their tech toys, they would be able to look up the spiders they see right o the spot. ff they don't get the answer they need from the book, well then, there is still always emailing me with a pic. :o)

Michigan Spiders the Ebook, will have all of the information the website does now and a little more. It will have good pictures of each spider. There will be more pictures showing the different varieties of many spiders. Some of the pictures have not even been added to the site yet.

Unfortunately, this will not be a free Ebook, but it will only be a few dollars and will be well worth having available wherever you are. I understand that many of you will have the Internet at your fingertips wherever you go, and you are welcome to continue using Michigan Spiders On-line as much as you wish. But for those of you who would like to have Michigan Spiders available and do not always have an Internet connection or signal, this is the way to go.

As soon as it is published and ready to go, I will post it here. Look for it soon!

Friday, July 20, 2012

The Myth of the Brown Recluse and the Black Widow Spiders

Brown Recluse - It seems that everyone knows someone who was bit by a Brown Recluse here in Michigan. I have had several comments here from people saying they were bit or knew someone who was bit by the Recluse. I have had several e-mails stating the same thing. So let me start this off by saying... "The Brown Recluse does NOT live here in Michigan!"

If you do not wish to believe me, try checking this page from the DNR itself.... DNR on the Brown Recluse Spider

The problem, in my opinion, is two fold. First, you have some infections like the MRSA infection that acts and looks very, very, similar to the Recluse bite. There are also some allergic reactions to spider bites that can have similar looking symptoms. Second, you have doctors who go to school, or do clinical portions of their studies, down in the southern states where the Recluse is actually indigenous. They are taught about the Recluse bite and so when they come to Michigan and see these same looking symptoms, they assume they are Recluse Spider bites. They, like most Michiganders, do not even realize that the Brown Recluse is not even in Michigan.

So you have doctors seeing these things, and misdiagnosing them as Recluse bites. The more doctors who diagnose infections and reactions as Brown Recluse bites, the more people spread the false rumors that the Recluse lives in Michigan and how they were bit. The more they spread the rumors, the more people who believe the Recluse is here in Michigan and so new doctors hear this and believe it as well. And the vicious circle continues....

According to the DNR, there has only been one confirmed sighting of the Brown Recluse here in Michigan ever. I have had two other experts tell me that the Brown Recluse is not in Michigan. I have found no documented cases to say otherwise.

If you are ever diagnosed here in Michigan by a doctor saying you were bit by the Brown Recluse, please tell them they are mistaken and to check for infectious diseases like MRSA or possible allergic reactions. It is my belief that, too often they treat people for Recluse bites and the infection does a lot more damage than it would if they treated for the correct thing to begin with.

Black Widow - I find it funny how everyone believes the Recluse is in Michigan and the Black Widow is not, when the exact opposite is the truth. Most people will tell you the Black Widow is not in Michigan. They are in fact here in Michigan.

It is far more common for the Black Widow Spider to be found along the Western coast of the lower peninsula of Michigan, but they are found in other areas as well, if more rarely. As a child, a found two spiders that I do believe were the Black Widow, in Madison Heights. Just this year alone, I have had several people tell me they found them and some of those people sent me pictures to prove it. So far the sightings that have been brought to my attention, have been along the West Coast as far North as Sleeping Bear Dunes. I have had reports from Gaylord and another place a little East of that (sorry, I cant remember the name of that place).

It is important to know that not all Black Widows are all black with a red hourglass underneath, like you see on TV all the time. The Northern Widow can have a red spotted stripe down its back. Some will have yellow or white markings on the sides of the abdomen and some can have red on the legs as well. It is important to learn more about the different looks of the Black Widows so you can recognize them if you ever see them.


To My Readers: The information I have put in this article is backed up by facts and evidence. I feel I have seen sufficient proof that the Widow does in fact live in Michigan, and sufficient proof that the Recluse in fact is NOT indigenous to Michigan.  If you do not agree with this information, you are more than welcome to state your case, under this guideline..... Your statement must be backed up by some kind of evidence. Documents, an official expert getting in touch with me, an official news station doing a story on it, etc... However, if any new comments are left, stating the opposite of what I have displayed here, AND there is no kind of evidence given to back up the claims, the comment will be deleted.

It is too important to me that my readers can come to Michigan Spiders to get the truth. If my information is wrong and evidence is put forth to back that up, then I will change the information accordingly. But I will no longer allow comments to continue to be left to spread fear when there is no proof to back it up.  All evidence (at this time) says the Recluse does NOT live in Michigan. No evidence says that it does. If it did, I would display it so because I believe the people should be aware of dangers rather than kept from the knowledge of them. That is why I let everyone know the Black Widow is in Michigan. But in the case of the Brown Recluse, there has yet to be any evidence put before me to say it is here in Michigan, therefore, I see any statements saying otherwise as nothing more than comments to create fear that is not called for.

If you wish me to change that stance, give me evidence as a reason to do so. Hearsay stories is not good enough. If you do not have evidence and just wish to argue, please feel to argue through e-mail. Convince me I am wrong, and I will change my story here.

Sunday, July 1, 2012

Wanted - Looking for these Spiders

I have mentioned these two spiders in previous comments and articles. I have personally seen both of these spiders in Madison Heights, Michigan, but have not seen either in over 30 years. I have looked for other spiders like these on-line but have yet to find the same ones. If anyone should know what kind they are, or better yet, should ever catch one, please let me know. The following pictures are those of Black Widows, that I changed in Photoshop to look like the spiders I caught as a kid. The Black Widow had the same body shape but the patterns did not match.


WANTED SPIDER #1
I have seen this spider twice in my life. One of those times I caught it in a jar with a friend and the other just happened to be on Halloween night and it was hanging from a guys screen door handle. When he closed his screen door, I saw it fall out of the outer handle and hang from a web then crawl back up the web and into the handle. I tried to point it out to my friends but it had disappeared before they looked and nobody believed me that there was a spider.

I am not sure if the yellow spots were in line in rows or scattered. The spider was the same structure as this picture, a deep shiny black, just like the Black Widow, but it did not have any patterns of the typical Black Widow or the Northern Black Widows and did not have the red markings underneath. Its only markings were the yellow dots on the abdomen. 

WANTED SPIDER #2
This spider I have only seen once. In fact, it was the same day as we caught the other spider. My friend and I had several spiders in one jar and both the black one with yellow spots and this one were in the jar. We caught them in two different places though.

Though this spider had the same structure and size as the spotted spider, this one was not the same color. Instead of being shiny black, it was more of a deep burgundy color and had no other markings.

SIZE
Both of these spiders were the two largest spiders we had caught. If memory serves me right, (legs included) I would say they were larger than the size of a quarter.



Sunday, April 29, 2012

Fishing Spider

Dolomedes Tenebrosus
Picture taken by: Laurel - Green Oaks Twp, Mi.


 Abdomen - Oblong and slightly longer than the cephalothorax. Usually in patterns of browns and black. They often have chevron markings but some are so chaotic looking it is hard to see the shapes.

Cephalothorax - Approximately two thirds the size of the abdomen. Usually in patterns of black and brown in color.

Size
- Some sites will state the females grow to around 75mm or 3" (including legs), but I have gotten reports and found wikipedia says as large as 100mm or about 4".

Bite Info - The Fishing spider is not considered aggressive, but may bite in defense of itself or of its eggs. They sometimes will carry their eggs underneath them. The venom is not dangerous to humans. With some of the larger species, it can cause some localized pain and swelling but there should be no lasting effects.

Other Notes - When the Fishing Spider lays eggs, it wraps them in a sac and carries it underneath them. Before they hatch it will tend to attach it to something and protect it.

Genus - Dolomedes Tenebrosus

Monday, April 9, 2012

Submitted Pics - Crab Spiders

The following, are pictures of Crab Spiders that have been submitted to me by others living in Michigan. In doing this, I am able to show pictures of spiders in Michigan that I myself have not seen, as well as more pics of those I have posted officially as being in Michigan.

Please understand that the Crab Spiders in this section may or may not be indigenous to Michigan. I would hope that others would be honest and actually send pics of the Crab Spiders they have actually found in Michigan, but I cannot make any guarantees.

I would also like to thank all of those listed below for their kindness in sending me these pics. If by any chance, you have sent me one of the following pics and you do not wish me to use it, or if any information is wrong, please email me and let me know.

Crab Spiders ....


Jenilee - Central Lake, Mi.

Sunday, April 8, 2012

Argiopes

Though I have not seen them personally, I feel confident that I have confirmed these to actually be living in Michigan. So far, I have identified two different species of the Argiope to live in Michigan. The Banded Argiope, and the Black and Yellow Argiope. As I find others, I will add them.


Banded Argiope



Black and Yellow Argiope


Abdomen - Large (more than double the cephalothorax) and oblong shaped. Usually black with white and yellow patterns. The pattern for the Banded Argiope has multiple stripes running across the abdomen. Males have a much more nondescript abdomen and the entire spider has more of a shiny fuzzy brownish look to it.

Cephalothorax - White (or light Gray) and slightly dull and fuzzy looking.

Female Size - Full grown they are typically around 1 Inch

Male Size - Much smaller than the female, these are typically only 1/4 inches.

Bite Info - The venom of the Argiope is not considered dangerous to humans.

Other Notes - The Argiopes are Orb Weavers and will spin webs in a circular pattern that is supported in a vertical manner to catch flying insects. Unlike most other Orb Weavers, the Argiope's web will usually have a long and thick zigzag pattern in the center.

Another name for them is the Saint Andrews Cross for the way they pair their legs up and stretch them out together to create a cross look.

Genus - Argiope aurantia (Black and Yellow Argiope) / Argiope trifasciata (Banded Argiope)

Submitted Pics - Black and Yellow Argiope

The following, are pictures of Black & Yellow Argiopes that have been submitted to me by others living in Michigan. In doing this, I am able to show pictures of spiders in Michigan that I myself have not seen, as well as more pics of those I have posted officially as being in Michigan.

Please understand that the Black & Yellow Argiope Spiders in this section may or may not be indigenous to Michigan. I would hope that others would be honest and actually send pics of the Black & Yellow Argiopes they have actually found in Michigan, but I cannot make any guarantees.

I would also like to thank all of those listed below for their kindness in sending me these pics. If by any chance, you have sent me one of the following pics and you do not wish me to use it, or if any information is wrong, please email me and let me know.


BLACK & YELLOW ARGIOPES....

Thomas - Watervliet, Mi.


Jason - Richfield Twp, Mi.



Bonnie - Bay City, Mi.



Chris - Ionia, Mi.



Heather - Plainwell, Mi.

Monday, March 26, 2012

Submitted Pics - Banded Argiope

The following, are pictures of Banded Argiopes that have been submitted to me by others living in Michigan. In doing this, I am able to show pictures of spiders in Michigan that I myself have not seen, as well as more pics of those I have posted officially as being in Michigan.

Please understand that the Banded Argiope Spiders in this section may or may not be indigenous to Michigan. I would hope that others would be honest and actually send pics of the Banded Argiopes they have actually found in Michigan, but I cannot make any guarantees.

I would also like to thank all of those listed below for their kindness in sending me these pics. If by any chance, you have sent me one of the following pics and you do not wish me to use it, or if any information is wrong, please email me and let me know.

Banded Argiopes

Michigan Spiders - Banded Argiope-4aKristy - Newaygo, Mi.



Michigan Spiders - Banded Argiope-4Kristy - Newaygo, Mi.



Michigan Spiders - Banded Argiope-1Brian - Willis, Mi.




Michigan Spiders - Banded Argiope-2Roy - Athens, Mi.




Michigan Spiders - Banded Argiope-3Ross - Rochester, Mi.




Michigan Spiders - Banded Argiope-5Matt - Macomb, Mi.